Professional academic writing in the humanities and social sciences

Professional academic writing in the humanities and social sciences

In her examination of attachment research, she traces the field's progress from its theoretical origins through its discovery of a method to a point of greater conceptual elaboration and agreement. A link to information on Turabian Style is also provided.

By tracing, over a period of two decades, how members of each field have discussed a problem in their professional discourse, MacDonald explores whether they have progressed toward a greater resolution of their problems.

But all these LSP discourses are also characterized by having a particular set of genres i. Similarly, in Colonial New England social history, MacDonald examines debates over the values of narrative and analysis and, in Renaissance New Historicism, discusses particularist tendencies and ways in which New historicist articles are organized by anecdotes and narratives.

Beyond that, students must learn not only what the conventions are but also why and how they are used to shape and communicate the knowledge of a discipline through investigation and argument.

Second, we have a number of indications that representations of agency are important, and variations in agency arc created through variations in sentence subjects. You are not currently authenticated. See a list of offerings by the Herbst Program. This chapter will focus on four patterns of variation that are discernible if academic disciplines are placed, roughly, on a continuum in which scientific and humanistic fields lie at opposite ends of the continuum, with the social sciences in between.

In this highly original new book, Susan Peck MacDonald tackles important and often controversial contemporary questions regarding the rhetoric of inquiry, the social construction of knowledge, and the professionialization of the academy.

It also provides a sample memo. Identifying discipline-specific patterns in paragraph length, for instance, will neither tell us much about discursive practices nor help us teach novices to generate disciplinary prose.

You will find helpful explanations and tips for writing in the natural sciences, social sciences, and the humanities. Writing About Art Hunter College Writing Center PDF This handout explains different types of art history papers and includes a series of rhetorical questions for analyzing paintings, portraits, figural scenes, landscapes, sculptures, and architecture.

These discourses occur in spoken and written texts of many sorts. The links below offer information about writing in various disciplines. In this highly original new book, Susan Peck MacDonald tackles important and often controversial contemporary questions regarding the rhetoric of inquiry, the social construction of knowledge, and the professionialization of the academy.

His goal is to prepare journalism students to enter the job market with all of the skills they need, including the ability to produce new media. If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'.

Writing in the Disciplines & Across the Curriculum

Ten Elements of an Effective Press Release This site offers suggestions to make press releases more effective. Her assumption is that knowledge making is the distinctive activity of the academy at the professional level; for that reason, it is important to examine differences in the ways the professional texts of subdisciplinary communities focus on and consolidate knowledge within their fields.

MacDonald argues that the academy has devoted more effort to analyzing theory and method than to analyzing its own texts. Quantitative Writing and Reasoning Guide for Social Sciences projects This site defines and gives examples of quantitative writing and offers sample assignments across disciplines.

Writing in History Any other course specifically approved for all students by the Undergraduate Education Council of the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Similarly, in Colonial New England social history, MacDonald examines debates over the values of narrative and analysis and, in Renaissance New Historicism, discusses particularist tendencies and ways in which New historicist articles are organized by anecdotes and narratives.

Additional Information In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: By tracing, over a period of two decades, how members of each field have discussed a problem in their professional discourse, MacDonald explores whether they have progressed toward a greater resolution of their problems.

The image of a continuum is useful as a way of exploring both relation and difference from one field to another, without needing to imply that there are discrete genres or rigidly demarcated classifications.

Any number of similar examples might be found. Throughout her work, MacDonald stresses her conviction that academics need to do a better job of explaining their text-making axioms, clarifying their expectations of students at all levels, and monitoring their own professional practices. Writing Across the Curriculum: The Anatomy of a Press Release This site provides the step-by-step process of producing a press release.

Compact and Diffuse Disciplinary Problems As arenas for knowledge making, disciplinary fields may be ranged roughly on a continuum from compact to diffuse in the ways they define, present, and attempt to solve problems.

The traces should be reciprocal, with text-level differences among the disciplines visible at the sentence level and sentence-level differences having text-level consequences.

Rice comes from a background of over 35 years in the news business, and in that time, he has seen the industry turn from traditional print journalism to an emphasis on new media technology. It does not provide a step-by-step account of the writing process for press releases; instead, it provides tips on improving existing writing.

I begin with models from the philosophy of science because they offer a way to explore variations in academic knowledge making. Compact and Diffuse Disciplinary Problems As arenas for knowledge making, disciplinary fields may be ranged roughly on a continuum from compact to diffuse in the ways they define, present, and attempt to solve problems.

You are not currently authenticated.Read the full-text online edition of Professional Academic Writing in the Humanities and Social Sciences (). Professional Academic Writing in the Humanities Professional Academic Writing in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

By Susan Peck MacDonald. Home Humanities, Social Sciences, and Writing Requirements pre Fall Humanities, Social Sciences, and Writing Requirements pre Fall You need at least 18 credit hours in humanities, social sciences, and writing in order to graduate from one of the College's 14.

academic writing in the disciplines with some examples from the humanities. On this slide we see some of the scope and variety within the humanities. Yeah, which includes a. Professional Academic Writing in the Humanities and Social Sciences Professional Academic Writing in the Humanities and Social Sciences Professional Academic Writing in the Humanities and Social Sciences Susan MacDonald No preview available - View allĀ».

In Professional Academic Writing in the Humanities and Social Sciences, Susan Peck MacDonald tackles important and often controversial contemporary questions regarding the rhetoric of inquiry, the social construction of knowledge, and the professionalization of the academy.

MacDonald argues that the academy has devoted more effort to analyzing theory and method than to analyzing its own ltgov2018.coms: 1. Writing in the Social Sciences Boston University offers general information about writing in Social Science courses.

Quantitative Writing and Reasoning Guide for Social Sciences projects This site defines and gives examples of quantitative writing and offers sample assignments across disciplines.

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Professional academic writing in the humanities and social sciences
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